Loading...

General (9)

Saturday, 07 March 2020 22:36

Who Killed Malcolm X? (Review)

Written by
Joe Green reviews the documentary, Who Killed Malcom X? by Ark Media, exposing the omissions that sacrifice clarity and context by treating the assassination like an ordinary murder, chasing individual suspects and missing the underlying political structures.
Sunday, 23 February 2020 23:45

Ark Media and Malcolm X: Bad Acting and Half-Truths

Written by
Karl Evanzz reviews the “theatrical” documentary, Who Killed Malcom X? by Ark Media, act by act and reveals the half-truths that make up the whole lie.
Wednesday, 27 June 2018 23:44

Tom Hanks and 1968

Written by
A thoroughly mediocre rendering of a tumultuous year. Mediocre in every way, including aesthetically, concludes Jim DiEugenio. Listen to the interview with David Giglio (Our Hidden History)
Jim DiEugenio reveals what CNN had to cover up about JFK and RFK in order to make this six-part series (with updates including new information since the first airing). Listen to the interview with David Giglio (Our Hidden History)
The best evidence for the triumph of neoconservatism, including over PBS, is to compare the 1983 series, Vietnam: A Television History, with the Burns/Novick version. The former is more honest, more hard-hitting, and more complete on the facts of the war. In a very real way, that comparison tells us how the Nixon/Kissinger view of Vietnam and the world eventually eclipsed JFK's, concludes Jim DiEugenio.
As depicted in Athens or at the Globe Theater, with tragedy there is always an element of both rage and violence. Johnson assiduously worked to spring his own trap on himself. And that is what is missing from this film, writes Jim DiEugenio.
Thursday, 28 September 2017 21:24

Ken Burns & Lynn Novick, The Vietnam War: Part Two

Written by
With their defense of the Dulles brothers as “decent people” in Part One, the disappearance of Kennedy’s withdrawal plan and the championing of Vann and Sheehan in Part Two, so far the net value of this documentary is something less than zero, writes Jim DiEugenio.
How can one tell the story of American involvement in Vietnam without mentioning the Dulles brothers or General Edward Lansdale? With a full 18 hours at one’s disposal, I would have thought such a thing would be impossible. Yet with Burns and Novick, the impossible becomes the possible, writes Jim DiEugenio.
Friday, 14 January 2011 21:53

The Illusion of Michael Shermer

Written by
Frank Cassano on Michael Shermer's own sleight of hand:  why one must be skeptical of the skeptic.

Find Us On ...

Sitemap

Please publish modules in offcanvas position.