James DiEugenio

James DiEugenio

One of the most respected researchers and writers on the political assassinations of the 1960s, Jim DiEugenio is the author of two books, Destiny Betrayed (1992/2012) and Reclaiming Parkland (2013/2016), co-author of The Assassinations, and co-edited Probe Magazine (1993-2000).   See "About Us" for a fuller bio.

Wednesday, 13 December 2017 23:12

Max Holland Says Enough!

Jim DiEugenio responds to Max Holland's preposterous lament that the MSM was guilty of much ado about nothing by spending an unwarranted two weeks covering the recent NARA releases of JFK documents.

The best volume on Robert Kennedy I have read since Arthur Schlesinger’s two volume set in 1978. If you want to know about Bobby Kennedy’s life, the Schlesinger book is your choice. But if you want to know who RFK was in his last years, this is the book to read. No politician I know of ever did or said these kinds of things at home and abroad, writes Jim DiEugenio.

Tuesday, 14 November 2017 21:39

The Newly Declassified JFK Assassination Files

Files supposedly declassified in full but mostly or entirely redacted, a national security apparatus which thwarts the law, and a media given to smug, glib or downright misinformed dismissals of both the process and content of the document releases mandated by the JFK Act: Jim DiEugenio reviews the current state of (non-) disclosure concerning the event which marked a crucial turning point in our nation's history and consciousness.

Friday, 27 October 2017 02:48

Rachel Maddow, JFK and Easy Money

Maddow’s staff fished out some archival footage from NBC, did some research on Pettit, got permission to show parts of JFK and called up Shenon. This results in nothing but aimless and uninformed banter, and is pretty much symptomatic of the MSM’s attitude toward these releases, writes Jim DiEugenio.

Wednesday, 18 October 2017 22:36

The Larry and Phil Show, Part 3

More from Jim DiEugenio on Larry Sabato and Philip Shenon concerning the upcoming NARA document release.

The best evidence for the triumph of neoconservatism, including over PBS, is to compare the 1983 series, Vietnam: A Television History, with the Burns/Novick version. The former is more honest, more hard-hitting, and more complete on the facts of the war. In a very real way, that comparison tells us how the Nixon/Kissinger view of Vietnam and the world eventually eclipsed JFK's, concludes Jim DiEugenio.

As depicted in Athens or at the Globe Theater, with tragedy there is always an element of both rage and violence. Johnson assiduously worked to spring his own trap on himself. And that is what is missing from this film, writes Jim DiEugenio.

With their defense of the Dulles brothers as “decent people” in Part One, the disappearance of Kennedy’s withdrawal plan and the championing of Vann and Sheehan in Part Two, so far the net value of this documentary is something less than zero, writes Jim DiEugenio.

How can one tell the story of American involvement in Vietnam without mentioning the Dulles brothers or General Edward Lansdale? With a full 18 hours at one’s disposal, I would have thought such a thing would be impossible. Yet with Burns and Novick, the impossible becomes the possible, writes Jim DiEugenio.

Saturday, 16 September 2017 17:17

Jim DiEugenio at the VMI Seminar

The following is the transcript of a talk Jim gave via remote connection for the seminar held at the Virginia Military Institute on Saturday, September 2, 2017.

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