James DiEugenio

James DiEugenio

One of the most respected researchers and writers on the political assassinations of the 1960s, Jim DiEugenio is the author of two books, Destiny Betrayed (1992/2012) and Reclaiming Parkland (2013/2016), co-author of The Assassinations, and co-edited Probe Magazine (1993-2000).   See "About Us" for a fuller bio.

Friday, 01 May 2009 18:20

Arlen Specter: Opportunist to the End

The Democrats may have won the election. But thanks to the likes of Rendell, Reid, Markos Moulitsas, Jane Hamsher, and Thom Hartmann, they are still in search of their souls, writes Jim DiEugenio.

Jim DiEugenio provides an advance reaction to Brothers in Arms, by Gus Russo and Stephen Molton, as announced in an article in American Heritage magazine.

Russell, with the help of Hulme, did a much better job of telling the story of Nagell in 2003 than he did in 1992, writes Jim DiEugenio.

An anthology of over forty chapters which spans many years of contributions, but the number of essays that are really important, insightful, and worth preserving is small, writes Jim DiEugenio.

The critiques that Milicent Cranor, David Mantik, Speer and myself have made of Mack's Discovery Channel debacles cannot be reduced to a disagreement over conclusions; they are based on the methods by which the conclusions were reached, writes Jim DiEugenio.

Larry Dunkel and the Sixth Floor are involved in serious, no-holds barred psychological warfare against the American public on the Kennedy case. In their brazen disregard of any journalistic integrity, their script and techniques might have been written by the likes of Allen Dulles or James Angleton, writes Jim DiEugenio.

Almost none of the following is included in the hour: the involvement of Ruby and Oswald in the Cuban conflict through the CIA and the Mafia; the plentiful and multi-leveled connections of Ruby to the DPD; the witnesses who indicate Oswald and Ruby knew each other, writes Jim DiEugenio.

Wednesday, 22 April 2009 16:26

Why the New York Times Deserves to Die

On the serious issues of the day, the scandals, the murders, and wars that make up modern American history, papers like the New York Times, Washington Post and LA Times have not just been wrong, but they have been misleading, writes Jim DiEugenio.

At the start ... everyone had high hopes for the blogosphere. We believed that without the pervading pressure of corporate sponsorship, without the inevitable ties to government officials at higher levels, this was a great opportunity to return American journalism to the days that the late Angus McKenzie recalled in his book Secrets. ... So far, it hasn't happened, laments Jim DiEugenio.

By not referencing the Smith piece, Hamsher can keep her readers misinformed and thereby attack Kennedy on false pretenses, replies Jim DiEugenio.

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