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(4 votes)

The best evidence for the triumph of neoconservatism, including over PBS, is to compare the 1983 series, Vietnam: A Television History, with the Burns/Novick version. The former is more honest, more hard-hitting, and more complete on the facts of the war. In a very real way, that comparison tells us how the Nixon/Kissinger view of Vietnam and the world eventually eclipsed JFK's, concludes Jim DiEugenio.

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(2 votes)

As depicted in Athens or at the Globe Theater, with tragedy there is always an element of both rage and violence. Johnson assiduously worked to spring his own trap on himself. And that is what is missing from this film, writes Jim DiEugenio.

Thursday, 28 September 2017 21:24

Ken Burns & Lynn Novick, The Vietnam War: Part Two

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(9 votes)

With their defense of the Dulles brothers as “decent people” in Part One, the disappearance of Kennedy’s withdrawal plan and the championing of Vann and Sheehan in Part Two, so far the net value of this documentary is something less than zero, writes Jim DiEugenio.

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(17 votes)

How can one tell the story of American involvement in Vietnam without mentioning the Dulles brothers or General Edward Lansdale? With a full 18 hours at one’s disposal, I would have thought such a thing would be impossible. Yet with Burns and Novick, the impossible becomes the possible, writes Jim DiEugenio.

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(4 votes)

If you’re looking for a short overview of important aspects of journalism and the government, there is good information here. It just doesn’t really live up to the title and subtitle, writes Joseph Green.

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(11 votes)

Joe Green assesses Vince Palamara's latest effort, concluding, "much of the material, especially the historical background work that the author has done with the agents themselves, is invaluable. And his persistence in attacking the work of Blaine/McCubbin/Hill is thoroughly admirable, if for no other reason than to continue our collective insurgency against the falsified historical record that the establishment wants to carve into stone."

Thursday, 06 April 2017 21:20

Carmine Savastano, Two Princes and a King

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Continuing in the direction marked out by The Assassinations (2003), this book is the latest contribution toward an interpretation of the assassinations of JFK, MLK and RFK not as isolated incidents but as related to each other.  Savastano has designed the book as something of a primer, a way of getting the lay person interested in all three of these momentous murders, writes Jim DiEugenio.

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(2 votes)

The author tried to get more than one journalist to either write an article or a book on this case. In the end, he ended up having to do both. That tells us a lot about the state of the media in this country. But this book tells us more. The vast majority of readers who read this review will likely be surprised at the facts and events described herein, avers Jim DiEugenio.

Saturday, 17 December 2016 02:46

Rules Don't Apply

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Howard Hughes Warren BeattyBecause Beatty has made some distinguished historical films, many had high hopes for this one. But the result seems to be rather uninspired for a film that he has contemplated doing for so long.  The best one can say is that it is competently made, writes Jim DiEugenio.

 

 

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rose coverExtraordinary, mostly never before seen photos, and a valuable document annex accompany Michael Marcades' narrative about his search for his mother, a time-consuming, courageous, and honest undertaking which gives us a picture of this unfortunate woman warts and all, concludes Jim DiEugenio.

 

 

 

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