General (17)

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(5 votes)
If you’re looking for a short overview of important aspects of journalism and the government, there is good information here. It just doesn’t really live up to the title and subtitle, writes Joseph Green.
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(11 votes)
Joe Green assesses Vince Palamara's latest effort, concluding, "much of the material, especially the historical background work that the author has done with the agents themselves, is invaluable. And his persistence in attacking the work of Blaine/McCubbin/Hill is thoroughly admirable, if for no other reason than to continue our collective insurgency against the falsified historical record that the establishment wants to carve into stone."
Thursday, 06 April 2017 21:20

Carmine Savastano, Two Princes and a King

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(6 votes)
Continuing in the direction marked out by The Assassinations (2003), this book is the latest contribution toward an interpretation of the assassinations of JFK, MLK and RFK not as isolated incidents but as related to each other.  Savastano has designed the book as something of a primer, a way of getting the lay person interested in all three of these momentous murders, writes Jim DiEugenio.
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(2 votes)
The author tried to get more than one journalist to either write an article or a book on this case. In the end, he ended up having to do both. That tells us a lot about the state of the media in this country. But this book tells us more. The vast majority of readers who read this review will likely be surprised at the facts and events described herein, avers Jim DiEugenio.
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(2 votes)
Extraordinary, mostly never before seen photos, and a valuable document annex accompany Michael Marcades' narrative about his search for his mother, a time-consuming, courageous, and honest undertaking which gives us a picture of this unfortunate woman warts and all, concludes Jim DiEugenio.      
Saturday, 11 June 2016 18:07

Mark Lane, Part II: Citizen Lane

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On the occasion of Mark Lane's passing, Jim DiEugenio looks back at his autobiography, concluding: "Lane’s life stands out as a man who did what he could to correct the evil and injustice in the world around him, with no target being too small or too large in that regard. This book stands out like a beacon in the night. It shows both what a citizen should be, and what an attorney can be."  
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(3 votes)
On the second to last page, Hill/McCubbin write: “As with our previous two books, our overriding concern was to present a factual account to preserve history, while also abiding by the Secret Service pledge to be worthy of trust and confidence.” I would say it is the latter part of that statement that has guided McCubbin, Hill and Blaine through all four books, concludes Vince Palamara.  
Saturday, 22 March 2014 15:36

Greg Parker, The Korean War Intelligence "Failure"

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An excerpt from the first volume of Greg Parker's study of the historical backdrop of Lee Harvey Oswald's intelligence related activities.      
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There is really nothing new in the book and its central thesis is simply not supported by the evidence. That CIA rogues were a part of the plot to kill Kennedy has been written before and in a far more persuasive manner than Nolan manages, writes Martin Hay.
Thursday, 12 September 2013 14:58

Lance deHaven-Smith, Conspiracy Theory In America

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deHaven-Smith has written some interesting material about the historical aspect of how conspiracy facts and thinking have been dealt with in American culture. But where the book gets into trouble is when the author tries to present his own rubric about how the public should deal with these types of crimes, writes Larry Hancock.
Wednesday, 01 August 2012 21:50

Clint Hill, Mrs. Kennedy and Me

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Unlike The Kennedy Detail, Clint Hill has written (again, with Lisa McCubbin) a fine book. That said, it is best to take some of his pre-assassination “reenactments” of statements made by others with a huge grain of salt, while also noting–with interest–those assassination and post-assassination revelations and statements that do ring true and are of interest to all, writes Vince Palamara.
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James DiEugenio reviews Dean T. Hartwell's book on forty years of government cover-ups.
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"First of all, let's talk about what you won't find in this book. It's not about how extraterrestrials are abducting human beings, or the Apollo moon landing being a colossal hoax perpetrated by NASA, or that Barack Obama somehow is not a natural-born American citizen. I leave these speculations to others, not that I take them seriously." [from the opening chapter]
Sunday, 28 March 2010 15:27

Russ Baker, Family of Secrets

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What Baker does with the JFK and Watergate episodes is symptomatic of the rest of the book. He wants to somehow implicate the Bushes in crimes for which there is next to no evidence, while not reporting on the ones for which there is plenty of evidence, writes Jim DiEugenio.
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S&V bemoan the "crippled epistemology" of conspiracy believers. Ironically, they themselves suffer from a profound, even mortal, wound in their own epistemology – i.e., they persistently ignore the difference between lies and truth, writes David Mantik.
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This book brings you closer to the real Jim Garrison. Not the deliberately and grossly distorted caricature that the MSM made him out to be. The real Jim Garrison was nothing like that, writes Jim DiEugenio.
Tuesday, 18 April 2006 23:06

William Turner, Rearview Mirror

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For me, and for most of his longtime admirers, the highlights of this distinguished and fascinating book were the chapters on the Garrison inquiry and the one on the Robert Kennedy murder, writes Jim DiEugenio.

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