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John Fitzgerald Kennedy (118)

Wednesday, 22 May 2019 00:32

Mark Shaw, Denial of Justice

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Shaw's book is largely a combination of recycling Kilgallen’s biographical material, his past writing about Melvin Belli, and trying to sell the reader on his remarkably unconvincing ideas about a Mob hit on JFK.
Friday, 03 May 2019 00:31

Mal Hyman, Burying the Lead: The Media and the JFK Assassination

Written by Michael Le Flem
“A balanced, engaging, fascinating look at the slimy underbelly of the American power structure and the hired guns of the media who cover up for them,” writes Michael Le Flem.
Tuesday, 19 March 2019 22:44

Paul Blake Smith, JFK and the Willard Hotel Plot

Written by Paul Bleau
Paul Bleau’s critical review of a book which argues that Carlos Marcello led the effort to assassinate JFK, sending Lee Harvey Oswald to Washington as part of a team meant to shoot the president from the Willard Hotel.
Thursday, 28 February 2019 22:24

John Newman, Countdown to Darkness, Volume 2

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In my opinion, Newman offers one of the best medium-length treatments of the Congo crisis I have read, writes Jim DiEugenio.
Friday, 08 February 2019 18:24

The Canadian Archives, Michele Metta, and the latest on Permindex

Written by John Kowalski
John Kowalski reviews Michele Metta's book about Permindex, CMC and the role of Italian fascists and freemasons in the JFK assassination, and also looks at the Louis Bloomfield papers and the recent lawsuits over their release.
Gayle Nix Jackson's 2017 collection of investigative vignettes surrounding the assassination of JFK provides both new evidence for researchers and presents many old facts in a new light.
From Michael's conclusion: Ganis’ book is an uncomfortable, freewheeling careen down strange dead-end tracks, with unannounced detours through cold dark streets full of faceless characters, and later, journeys through mirror-filled fun houses of speculation, with a final twist and turn that spits you out right over Niagara Falls, barrel and all.
Dr. Mantik states: “It is unique for me to write a second review, but too much remained unsaid after the first review. Wagner’s book clearly required more attention, especially since his profound mistakes are so often duplicated by the unenlightened mainstream media.” (Robert Wagner has now responded to this second version; read it here)
Michael Le Flem reviews a book about reporting on the JFK case by a reporter. The book starts out quite strong and rigorous, but about halfway through it goes off the rails. But the first part is worth reading.
The strength of the book lies in the tracing of the Oswald files through the CIA under Angleton’s dominion. No book on Angleton has done this before. And that is certainly a commendable achievement. Hopefully, this will become a staple of future Angleton scholarship, writes Jim DiEugenio.
The main reason why I am recommending this book is because it’s out there … I would much rather [regular, everyday people] bought a book like this one, than, say, one by Bill O’Reilly—or whoever the “other side’s” designated shill happens to be this week, observes Frank Cassano.
There is a long list of books about which it can be rightly said they have added nothing to our understanding of JFK’s murder because their authors placed their conclusions first and then twisted, warped, and distorted the details to fit. Wagner’s book undoubtedly belongs on that list, concludes Martin Hay.
What the Bishop-Veciana-Oswald connection may actually have involved could be hidden among the 1,100 long-suppressed CIA records related to the JFK assassination, including four of Phillips’ operational files and Veciana’s routing and record sheet, conjectures Prof. Fernandez.
An "incredibly improbable memoir ..., and the most incredible thing is how much of the story is demonstrably true", remarks Joseph Green, who further observes that "the author adopts a straightforward prose style and appears to be doing his best to give the truth as he sees it. For that he deserves some kudos."
In the second installment of this book review/essay, Jeff Carter focuses on questions of authenticity, alteration, and the NPIC analyses which occurred over the week-end of the assassination but which the CIA later tried to deflect and all but make disappear from the record.
The first in a two-part installment in which Jeff Carter reviews a book that "reveals some new – albeit not earth-shattering – information", but is also "imbued with a certain partisanship, not limited to family interests, which dulls the author’s critical thinking in some key areas."
If Shaw had restrained himself, or if he had had an editor to point out the problems with his design, then this would have been a good and valuable book about Dorothy Kilgallen:  who she really was, what we know and do not know about her death. But such was not the case.  I would actually recommend Sara Jordan’s informative and objective essay instead, concludes Jim DiEugenio.
Thursday, 24 November 2016 20:20

Bruce Riedel, JFK’s Forgotten Crisis

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  After reading [this book], I was able to understand what this was all about—at least in a fundamental way. Also, my respect for President John F. Kennedy, which was already estimable, increased a bit more, writes Jim DiEugenio.    
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