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Michael Le Flem reviews a book about reporting on the JFK case by a reporter. The book starts out quite strong and rigorous, but about halfway through it goes off the rails. But the first part is worth reading.

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The strength of the book lies in the tracing of the Oswald files through the CIA under Angleton’s dominion. No book on Angleton has done this before. And that is certainly a commendable achievement. Hopefully, this will become a staple of future Angleton scholarship, writes Jim DiEugenio.

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The main reason why I am recommending this book is because it’s out there … I would much rather [regular, everyday people] bought a book like this one, than, say, one by Bill O’Reilly—or whoever the “other side’s” designated shill happens to be this week, observes Frank Cassano.

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There is a long list of books about which it can be rightly said they have added nothing to our understanding of JFK’s murder because their authors placed their conclusions first and then twisted, warped, and distorted the details to fit. Wagner’s book undoubtedly belongs on that list, concludes Martin Hay.

Thursday, 11 January 2018 20:32

JFK Declassified: Tracking Oswald, Part 7

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Arnaldo Fernandez returns to wrap up his review of this miserable History Channel series with a searing look at the seventh episode, which adds insult to injury by pretending to be an update in response to the October 26, 2017 “final declassification” of JFK records.

Wednesday, 12 July 2017 22:21

JFK Declassified: Tracking Oswald, Part 6

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In this final installment of his review of the History Channel series, Arnaldo Fernandez concludes: “With Castro as vantage point instead of the CIA, Baer was not tracking Oswald to articulate a true picture of the past, but to drive the historical truth away.”

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After mixing Oswald with the anti-Castro and CIA-backed paramilitaries of Alpha 66 in a weird pot made of “special intent to kill President Kennedy soup”, Baer keeps on blighting a big-budget TV show by ignoring the body of the evidence, writes Arnaldo Fernandez.  With an insert by Milicent Cranor on the History Channel's version of the "jet effect".

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Arnaldo Fernandez, assisted by Frank Cassano, returns with a review of part 4 of the The History Channel series, entitled “The Cuban Connection,” in which Baer and Bercovici stage what our authors call “a hell of a sleight of hand”: the claim that the anti-Castro Cubans collaborated with the pro-Castro, Marxist wannabe killer Oswald, in order to get rid of JFK – a collaboration the CIA and FBI completely missed.

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With the assistance of Frank Cassano, Arnaldo Fernandez continues the critical tracking of this History Channel series – apparently no longer being aired in the United States – with a review of part 3, “Oswald Goes Dark”.

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While advertising ad nauseam that his “new investigation” uncovers “new evidence”, Baer remains tethered to a pair of fallen trees: The Warren Commission Report and the Red conspiracy theory masterminded by the CIA. Both have long been knocked down, writes Arnaldo Fernandez.

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