Paul Bleau

Paul Bleau

Paul Bleau holds an MBA from McGill University; he owned and ran a leading marketing communications agency for 25 years, and supervised Canada’s first "denormalization" campaign of the tobacco industry.  Since 2006, he has been professor at St. Lawrence College. His break-through study of how history textbooks cover the JFK assassination and how their authors defend themselves, along with a series of follow-up pieces, are published on this site. He has also been a guest on BlackOp Radio.

As with many things, Jim Garrison was the first investigator to elucidate a three-sided conspiracy to assassinate President Kennedy, the three participants being the CIA, the Cuban exiles, and the Mob. He had done this unearthing during his inquiry, but he formally announced it in a famous cover story for New Orleans Magazine in 1976. The Church Committee's exposure of the CIA/Mafia plots to kill Castro filled this in with the figures of John Roselli and Santo Trafficante. And it also outlined the close relationship between CIA officer Bill Harvey and Roselli. Tony Summers made this triangular plot a feature of his book Conspiracy, first published in 1980. In the nineties, Fidel Castro's chief of security, Fabian Escalante, began to publish and speak on the subject of JFK's murder and he also advocated for this view of the plot.

Paul Bleau here synthesizes the decades-long history of cooperation between Cubans, organized crime, U.S. intelligence and corporate interests, and expands it into what amounts to a visual essay in order to dispel the notion that such a partnership was too complicated to have been behind the assassination of President Kennedy.

Paul Bleau offers an exhaustive review of sixty-four individuals with whom Oswald came in contact, and who had either plausible, probable, or definite intelligence links –– something that Bob Baer seems almost entirely to have missed in the “Tracking Oswald” series.

3 plots mixed

Paul Bleau suggests that historians need to examine the similarities of the (failed) attempts on Kennedy's life in Chicago, L.A. and Tampa, and their links to executive action M.O., and to draw the more probable conclusions from this comparative methodology.

A complaint, addressed to the American Historical Association by professor Paul Bleau, accusing historians of actually violating their own code of conduct in their treatment of the JFK assassination.

Part two of the study, in which professor Bleau focuses on what interested historians could easily learn from the official investigations and the opinions and statements from the actual investigators, lawyers, and staff members who were involved in six investigations that were mostly government initiated and managed, if they weren't so predisposed to accept blindly the conclusions of the Warren Commission.

In this two-part companion to his study of the textbook treatments of the JFK assassination, professor Bleau focuses on what interested historians could easily learn from the official investigations and the opinions and statements from the actual investigators, lawyers, and staff members who were involved in six investigations that were mostly government initiated and managed, if they weren't so predisposed to accept blindly the conclusions of the Warren Commission.

In the second and third parts of his series on how school textbooks treat the JFK Assassination, Paul Bleau analyses in greater detail their inadequacies, and proposes some possible remedies.

In this series, history professor Paul Bleau examines how the JFK assassination is treated in school textbooks, and publishes excerpts from correspondence with some of the authors to whom he posed several methodological questions. The answers are highly revealing.

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