Jim DiEugenio on the announcement that George and Leonardo DiCaprio intend to make a film based Legacy of Secrecy.

At the end of his review of JFK and the Unspeakable, DiEugenio wrote that Jim Douglass’ book was the best in the field since Gerald McKnight’s.  The author’s own book has a dual distinction.  It is the best book on Garrison yet written, and it is the best work on the JFK case since the Douglass book, writes Albert Rossi.

Sunday, 31 March 2013 22:03

The Mystery of Red Bird Airport

Larry Hancock explores the possible use of the Dallas private airfield for covert goverment operations during the period around JFK's assassination.
Monday, 07 January 2013 16:10

Brian Latell, Castro’s Secrets

Dr. Latell ... used the creative imagination of Cuban defectors for writing a non-fiction book instead of a novel about the JFK assassination, concludes Arnaldo Fernandez.

 

 

Monday, 07 January 2013 15:00

HSCA Interview with Fidel Castro

Continuation of narration by Chief Counsel G. Robert Blakey and the playing of excerpts from a tape recording of an interview with President Fidel Castro.

Published in News Items
Wednesday, 07 November 2012 16:47

Noam Chomsky’s Sickness unto Death

Chomsky has now been proven both wrong and misleading on both Kennedy and Vietnam, and the Missile Crisis. But it’s worse than that. Chomsky simply has no regard for facts or evidence in the two cases, writes Jim DiEugenio.

Thursday, 01 September 2011 14:53

James W. Douglass, JFK and the Unspeakable

 

 

A rich, rewarding, and reverberating book which both illuminates and empowers the reader, the best book in the field since Breach of Trust, writes Jim DiEugenio.

 

 

Sunday, 28 March 2010 15:27

Russ Baker, Family of Secrets

What Baker does with the JFK and Watergate episodes is symptomatic of the rest of the book. He wants to somehow implicate the Bushes in crimes for which there is next to no evidence, while not reporting on the ones for which there is plenty of evidence, writes Jim DiEugenio.

Published in General

There is an almost pathological use of conditionals; may have, perhaps, could have, if, etc. Conversely, there is an overabundance of hackneyed declaratives where conditionals should have been used, as well as an over-reliance on unnamed sources. And yet this dogged pursuit and elucidation of the documentary record is supposed to be the sine qua non of these two books, writes Bill Davy.

Jim DiEugenio provides an advance reaction to Brothers in Arms, by Gus Russo and Stephen Molton, as announced in an article in American Heritage magazine.

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