Wednesday, 08 July 2015 20:39

John T. Shaw, JFK in the Senate

In light of the recent developments in our understanding of JFK's foreign policy vision, Jim DiEugenio writes: "In sum, this is not a bad book. And I think some of its faults can be explained by Shaw’s association with the Wall Street Journal and the Hoover Institute.  But in my opinion it could have been much better".

What could have been an important and sterling volume is seriously compromised with a lot of litter. Instead of being up there with Rakove and Muehlenbeck, it stands a couple of steps downward, with Thurston Clarke’s mixed bag of nuts, concludes Jim DiEugenio.

 

 

Wednesday, 11 February 2015 23:34

David Heymann Haunts us from the Grave

Correcting An 'American Legacy'

by Anne Johnson, At:  NPR Ombudsman

Published in News Items

Slideshows for three presentations on JFK's foreign policy given in 2013, 2014, 2016 and 2018.

"A Motive For Murder: Kennedy's Foreign Policy" – audio interview with Alan Dale, at JFK Lancer.

Published in Videos & Interviews
Tuesday, 04 November 2014 15:44

JFK: A President Betrayed

This film is much worth seeing. And it deserved a much larger platform than it got last year. Right now, it's the best screen depiction of Kennedy's foreign policy that I know of, writes Jim DiEugenio.

Friday, 22 August 2014 16:46

Michael Swanson, The War State

A valuable Big Picture book, one with many new sources for study, which bring in much fascinating information. The light [Swanson] sheds on men like Nitze and Acheson show just what hollow clowns the so-called Wise Men of the media really were. [The book] also demonstrates just how powerful and dangerous the Military Industrial Complex has become. By showing Kennedy's opposition to it, he may have also shown why Kennedy was killed, concludes Jim DiEugenio.

Monday, 21 July 2014 16:16

Jeff Greenfield, If Kennedy Lived

The once progressive co-author of A Populist Manifesto with this book has written the worst kind of alternative history, one seriously colored by the view from the present, and more specifically, of those who won and those who lost, with a decided bias in favor of those who won, writes Jim DiEugenio.

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