Larry Dunkel and the Sixth Floor are involved in serious, no-holds barred psychological warfare against the American public on the Kennedy case. In their brazen disregard of any journalistic integrity, their script and techniques might have been written by the likes of Allen Dulles or James Angleton, writes Jim DiEugenio.

Almost none of the following is included in the hour: the involvement of Ruby and Oswald in the Cuban conflict through the CIA and the Mafia; the plentiful and multi-leveled connections of Ruby to the DPD; the witnesses who indicate Oswald and Ruby knew each other, writes Jim DiEugenio.

The DVD has new and fascinating information in it. And it also reveals just how hard the forces of the cover-up must work to keep the autopsy evidence in this case in check, writes Jim DiEugenio.

Tuesday, 16 June 2009 13:36

William Olsson, An American Affair

Author Philip Sheridan reviews the film "inspired by" the Mary Meyer story and directed by William Olsson.

Saturday, 05 January 2008 11:52

Shane O'Sullivan, RFK Must Die

Overall, the film is a sad and puzzling disappointment. It could and should have been much better. Considering the state of knowledge in the case, and the state of computer technology, it should have been compelling in form and convincing in content, laments Jim DiEugenio.

Published in Robert Francis Kennedy
Friday, 03 August 2007 21:23

The Good Shepherd

The Good Shepherd was subtitled in its trailer, “The Untold Story of the Birth of the CIA.” This is a real misnomer, since most of the “untold” actual events are immediately recognizable to anyone who has a cursory knowledge of the history of the CIA. In another sense the subtitle is true since the story it tells is very liberally fictionalized. In that sense, it is untold, writes Philip Sheridan.

Published in General

Early article on the Hanks/Playtone miniseries project.

Published in News Items
Saturday, 09 December 2006 17:51

Bobby: A Review

Estevez had a huge and magnificent historical subject. For all the liberties he has taken, and for reasons stated above, he didn't do it justice, concludes Philip Sheridan.

Published in Robert Francis Kennedy
Sunday, 03 December 2006 17:04

Hugh Aynesworth Never Quits

Dallas journalist and erstwhile Garrison critic continues to defend Clay Shaw as the source of a proposed screenplay with Jim Piddock, writes Jim DiEugenio.

I wish Ambrose and Schlesinger had read the Review Board's declassified files ... [and] used them for their work in this volume. Until they do, Stone is completely justified in making these films and therefore keeping the historical establishment honest, writes Jim DiEugenio.

Published in General
Page 5 of 6

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