Friday, 15 October 1999 20:54

Oswald, the CIA and Mexico City

An excerpt from some of John Newman's groundbreaking work on the Oswald imposter in Mexico City.

Because no one pursued the truth about Lumumba at the time, and no one found the truth about Hammarskjold's death, assassination remained a viable way to change foreign policy, writes Lisa Pease.

Published in General
Monday, 15 February 1999 22:16

Dodd and Dulles vs. Kennedy in Africa

The following is not polemics. It is actually history. It tells the truth about an important event. But as it does so, it reveals the true character of the men who helped mold it: Eisenhower, Allen Dulles, Lumumba, Thomas Dodd, Joseph Mobutu, Hammarskjold, Moise Tshombe, Cyrille Adoula, Johnson and, primarily, JFK – writes Jim DiEugenio.

Thursday, 15 October 1998 23:03

The Sins of Robert Blakey

The declassified files of the HSCA reveal how Blakey, unlike Richard Sprague, manoeuvered the committee away from investigating the role of the CIA and toward a predefined conclusion, reports Jim DiEugenio.

The second part of Lisa Pease's masterful review of the RFK assassination case, which focuses on alternate explanations for how and why RFK was murdered.

Published in Robert Francis Kennedy

An early draft of material on the Tippit murder later incorporated into John Armstrong's Harvey & Lee.

A classic and much-discussed essay which explores at length and in depth both the provenance and the evolution of these "JFK scandal stories" over a number of years: how they morphed over time at each appearance into something they were not when they first appeared.

 

On November 5, 1963, Otepka was finally formally ousted from the State Department. Just seventeen days later, Kennedy would be assassinated. And the killing would be pinned on the man Otepka was trying to investigate when he was removed from his office, writes Lisa Pease.

Sunday, 15 December 1996 21:37

No Lieutenant Columbo in Mexico City

Lisa Pease examines the Slawson report in light of his willingness to be "guided" by the CIA, and concludes that it shows how once again the Commission deliberately ignored, misrepresented or played down evidence available to them.

The disappearance of this item which originally appeared on the (first) Dallas police list of Oswald's belongings points to collusion between the Paines and the FBI, argues Carol Hewett.

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