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John Fitzgerald Kennedy (129)

After reading this volume, the only apparent betrayal will be to the consumer who plunks down $25.00 for this mess, complains Bill Davy.        
It would not necessarily be surprising ... if [LBJ] had foreknowledge or tacitly approved of the assassination. ... I do not think, however, that at this date ... an explanation which ignores the larger political forces of the national security state can be taken seriously, writes Joseph Green.
[This] book is more about the CIA's nefarious and illegal operations, including the MK/ULTRA project. If you are interested in learning more about the shadowy world of the CIA, this is a good book. If you are interested in learning more about what happened to JFK and why he was assassinated, I believe there are many books out there that do a better job in answering your questions, writes Vasilios Vazakas.
Wednesday, 11 September 2013 17:48

Saint John Hunt, The Bonds of Secrecy

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In the early days after the Rolling Stone article appeared, it appears that [Saint John] and his brother actually had a good deal of skepticism towards what their father had told him about the mechanics of the assassination.  What happened to that skepticism? ... Hunt's personal story, with some good supplementary research about his father and mother, could have been politically interesting and personally compelling. But it didn't come out that way, concludes Seamus Coogan.
By any standards, Lane's resume is impressive, and I have a great deal of respect for the man. So it is with heavy heart that I must say his latest and most likely his last book on the murder of JFK is—for me at least—a little disappointing, writes Martin Hay.      
Wednesday, 28 August 2013 21:46

Larry Hancock, NEXUS

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  An interesting and worthwhile work. ... it has a unique approach to it, and Hancock’s analysis of the crime has sophistication, intelligence and nuance to it, writes Jim DiEugenio.    
Wednesday, 28 August 2013 18:44

Barry Ernst, The Girl on the Stairs

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Joseph Green and Jim DiEugenio look at Barry Ernst's account of his personal quest to find Victoria Adams, a key witness in the Texas School Book Depository on November 22, 1963.
Wednesday, 28 August 2013 14:40

Peter Kross, JFK: The French Connection

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  A disjointed, unorganized, poorly referenced, repetitive ramble. ... With nearly two million pages of declassified documents, the JFK case should be an interesting topic. This book competes with Harrison Livingstone’s The Radical Right and Joe Farrell’s oft criticized tome for flat out over-reliance on unworthy theories, not to mention narrative incoherence, opines Seamus Coogan.  
A valiant book that sometimes stumbles and falls short of its proclaimed goal ... On the other hand, the author does a skillful job on several core topics, writes Dr. David Mantik.
McAdams likes to warn us about how “noise” clouds our perceptions. He should know, he’s directly responsible for a great deal of it, asserts Frank Cassano.
Line after line, paragraph after paragraph, page after page, McAdams trudges tirelessly onward, selectively using testimony to reach a particular conclusion. Though readers may find that it’s perhaps a bit short on fact, and a tad thin on logic, JFK Assassination Logic more than compensates by being wonderfully long on misguided patriotism, concludes Gary Aguilar.
At the end of his review of JFK and the Unspeakable, DiEugenio wrote that Jim Douglass’ book was the best in the field since Gerald McKnight’s.  The author’s own book has a dual distinction.  It is the best book on Garrison yet written, and it is the best work on the JFK case since the Douglass book, writes Albert Rossi.
Monday, 15 April 2013 19:08

Harrison E. Livingstone, Kaleidoscope

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There are some valid criticisms in the book and Livingstone is to be properly praised for them. He certainly straightens out certain issues that needed to be elucidated in Horne’s very long five volume series. But when one adds up the ratio of good criticism to everything else in the volume, it is not a very good batting average, writes Jim DiEugenio.  
Monday, 07 January 2013 16:10

Brian Latell, Castro’s Secrets

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Dr. Latell ... used the creative imagination of Cuban defectors for writing a non-fiction book instead of a novel about the JFK assassination, concludes Arnaldo Fernandez.    
Despite telling us that “consistency with other evidence is very important to scientists”, he appears to have studied each point in isolation and then cherry-picked the details that fit his own thesis. The one point it can really be said that Dr. G. Paul Chambers Ph. D. both makes and proves in his book is that credentials and a good reputation are no proof against being wrong, concludes Martin Hay.
  [Adams] is remarkably open and honest about being inexperienced on the Milteer assignment and about his being unaccustomed in terms of research on the JFK case. Therefore, when he comes to naming who he thinks are the 'players and the patsies", he readily acknowledges that other, more informed, researchers have worked the beat before. This selflessnes ... is something of a rarity, notes Seamus Coogan.  
Thursday, 12 July 2012 20:01

Peter Janney, Mary's Mosaic (Part 2)

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The fact that Janney’s book has been accepted by some in the critical community indicates to me the continuing ascendancy of the Alex Jones, “anything goes” school, writes Jim DiEugenio.
Thursday, 21 June 2012 16:03

Peter Janney, Mary's Mosaic (Part 1)

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Janney tries to make an epic romance out of a story which--when read strictly on a factual basis, sans Janney’s spin--seems anything but, writes Lisa Pease.
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