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John Fitzgerald Kennedy (129)

Monday, 21 July 2014 16:16

Jeff Greenfield, If Kennedy Lived

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The once progressive co-author of A Populist Manifesto with this book has written the worst kind of alternative history, one seriously colored by the view from the present, and more specifically, of those who won and those who lost, with a decided bias in favor of those who won, writes Jim DiEugenio.
Monday, 07 July 2014 18:57

Jeffrey Sachs, To Move The World

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    Jim DiEugenio reviews Columbia University economist and author Jeffrey Sachs' latest book, which examines Kennedy's famous 1963 American University speech.       
[Livingstone] was once a heroic pioneer in the medical evidence. His books (and Lifton's contributions, too) were invaluable introductions for me. For that I am still grateful to both. Unfortunately, I see little of value in this book, but rather lots of pointless confusion. The book should not have been written-and it should not be read, concludes David Mantik.
Taken as a whole, this is a valuable book. When coupled with Muehlenbeck's Betting on the Africans, much needed light has now been cast over the specifics of Kennedy's dealings with the Third World: how these broke with the past, and how LBJ and Nixon then returned them to their previous state, writes Jim DiEugenio.
Sunday, 13 April 2014 17:47

Robert Groden, Absolute Proof

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Bob Groden has been a true champion of the case for the public. He has devoted much of his adult life trying to show that the Warren Commission was nothing but a sham meant to conceal the true facts of Kennedy's death. His current book is a decidedly mixed bag of virtues and liabilities. But taken as a trilogy, his last three books form what is the best photo library available in book form on this case, writes Jim DiEugenio.
Wednesday, 09 April 2014 18:47

Vincent M. Palamara, Survivor's Guilt

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At the end, Palamara lists a very good chronicle of failures by the Secret Service in Dallas. It goes on for three pages. It is very provocative and even disturbing. The author uses it to crystallize the argument he has been making without being explicit about it [, concluding] that the Secret Service was not just negligent, but culpable in the assassination. With the amount of evidence in the first half of the book, it's hard to disagree with him, writes Jim DiEugenio.  
Saturday, 29 March 2014 19:10

Dale Myers, With Malice (Part 2)

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The second and concluding installment of a long and detailed critique of Myer's arguments for Oswald's culpability in the Tippit murder.
Sunday, 09 March 2014 19:00

Dale Myers, With Malice (Part 1)

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The first installment of a long and detailed critique of Myer's arguments for Oswald's culpability in the Tippit murder.
Joseph McBride replies to Dale Myer's crticisms, concluding: "I am hardly surprised to be subjected to the same basically irrelevant treatment by an author who either refuses to deal seriously with the many genuine issues of the Tippit case or is incapable of doing so, as his book and article seem to indicate."
Dallek has designed both of his books along the lines that Larry Sabato did in The Kennedy Half Century. They are not full and complete works which try and capture all nuances and tendencies in an objective manner; a manner which will actually elucidate for and enlighten the reader. Like Sabato, Dallek wishes to constrict the biography he is writing to keep Kennedy from being any kind of liberal icon, writes Jim DiEugenio.
Friday, 27 December 2013 20:35

Larry Sabato, The Kennedy Half Century

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Except for where he notes some of the problems with the JFK assassination's evidentiary record, this book is pretty much not just without distinction, but so agenda driven as to be misleading. On the 50th anniversary of Kennedy's murder, we needed a lot better, writes Jim DiEugenio.
Wednesday, 18 December 2013 11:46

Howard P. Willens, History Will Prove Us Right

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Author Martin Hay writes about Warren Commission lawyer Howard Willens and his continued belief in the conclusions of the Warren Report.
Friday, 13 December 2013 16:33

Jerome Corsi, Who Really Killed Kennedy?

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Despite its mistakes this is a decent enough book for the novice and general public who are not aware of the machinations of deep politics and JFK assassination case, writes Vasilios Vazakas.
Self-promotion by adopting the right talking points characterizes the work of people like Sabato, eager to become televised mouthpieces of establishment propaganda in an age of dying empire, writes Mike Swanson.
I was seriously disappointed by this book ... because it fell so far short of its announced goals (of explaining and promoting critical thinking), writes David Mantik.
Wednesday, 04 December 2013 22:16

Philip Shenon, A Cruel and Shocking Act

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If one wants to read the real story behind what happened inside the Warren Commission, read Inquest or Breach of Trust, not this book, writes Jim DiEugenio.
Jim DiEugenio writes of how the author of what was a good book on the JFK case when it first came out has subsequently held less tenable views of both John Kennedy and his assassination, and how he blindly jettisons Garrison's achievements.
Tuesday, 29 October 2013 21:17

James DiEugenio, Reclaiming Parkland

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Jim DiEugenio's second book on the JFK assassination, which takes Bugliosi's pretentious and inflated bag of obfuscation as its framework for dismantling the Warren Commission, the Clark Panel, and the HSCA, and for further revealing how beholden the film and TV industry has become to Washington in general and to the CIA in particular.  A masterful dissection of a rotting corpse, and the rightful heir to Accessories after the Fact. [Al Rossi]
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