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O’Neill’s book on the Tate/LaBianca murders “does an excellent job in exposing the unethical tactics that Bugliosi and the DA’s office indulged itself in to make sure they would ram the perpetrators into the gas chamber,” writes Jim DiEugenio.
Wednesday, 22 May 2019 00:32

Mark Shaw, Denial of Justice

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Shaw's book is largely a combination of recycling Kilgallen’s biographical material, his past writing about Melvin Belli, and trying to sell the reader on his remarkably unconvincing ideas about a Mob hit on JFK.
“A balanced, engaging, fascinating look at the slimy underbelly of the American power structure and the hired guns of the media who cover up for them,” writes Michael Le Flem.
Tuesday, 19 March 2019 22:44

Paul Blake Smith, JFK and the Willard Hotel Plot

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Paul Bleau’s critical review of a book which argues that Carlos Marcello led the effort to assassinate JFK, sending Lee Harvey Oswald to Washington as part of a team meant to shoot the president from the Willard Hotel.
Thursday, 28 February 2019 22:24

John Newman, Countdown to Darkness, Volume 2

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In my opinion, Newman offers one of the best medium-length treatments of the Congo crisis I have read, writes Jim DiEugenio.
The author’s narrative gifts are as pronounced as her investigative acumen. And with this book as her lifetime achievement on a case that still remains relatively obscure in light of the JFK assassination, she will likely establish herself as the preeminent authority on the subject for years to come, avers Michael Le Flem.
John Kowalski reviews Michele Metta's book about Permindex, CMC and the role of Italian fascists and freemasons in the JFK assassination, and also looks at the Louis Bloomfield papers and the recent lawsuits over their release.
Gayle Nix Jackson's 2017 collection of investigative vignettes surrounding the assassination of JFK provides both new evidence for researchers and presents many old facts in a new light.
In the final part of this essay, Jim turns to the “War on Poverty”, showing how the Kennedys, with David Hackett in the lead, were planning that program before JFK's civil rights bill was passed, and how, once Johnson took office, it was altered from its original intent and handed over to local authorities who hijacked it. Listen now to Part 4 (The Kennedys’ War on Poverty) of the interview with David Giglio, courtesy of Our Hidden History
In the third part of this review essay, Jim enumerates in detail the accomplishments of the Kennedy White House in the area of civil rights over the span of its brief three years, appending a table comparing these with those of the previous three administrations. Listen now to Part 3 (The Kennedys Tear Down Jim Crow) of the interview with David Giglio, courtesy of Our Hidden History
From Michael's conclusion: Ganis’ book is an uncomfortable, freewheeling careen down strange dead-end tracks, with unannounced detours through cold dark streets full of faceless characters, and later, journeys through mirror-filled fun houses of speculation, with a final twist and turn that spits you out right over Niagara Falls, barrel and all.
In the second part of this review essay, Jim puts the glaring misrepresentations in Levingston, Margolick and Dyson under the microscope, ending with a long overdue critique of what has unjustly become a progressive shibboleth, the story of RFK's May 1963 meeting in New York with James Baldwin and other civil rights activists. Listen now to Part 2 (The MSM vs History) of the interview with David Giglio, courtesy of Our Hidden History
In the first part of this long review essay, Jim DiEugenio lays bare the atrocities which ensued from a defeated Reconstruction and the legal and social precedents this created, in an effort to clarify the historical backdrop to the inaction of nearly every US president up until JFK. Listen now to Part 1 (Reconstruction) of the interview with David Giglio, courtesy of Our Hidden History
Dr. Mantik states: “It is unique for me to write a second review, but too much remained unsaid after the first review. Wagner’s book clearly required more attention, especially since his profound mistakes are so often duplicated by the unenlightened mainstream media.” (Robert Wagner has now responded to this second version; read it here)
As reviewer Edward Curtin opines:  when a truthful, beautifully written and moving book published by a major house is shunned by mainstream book reviewers, one can fairly well guess the book has touched a sore spot which the corporate media would prefer not to expose to the public.  So it is with this courageous memoir by RFK's son and namesake.
Michael Le Flem reviews a book about reporting on the JFK case by a reporter. The book starts out quite strong and rigorous, but about halfway through it goes off the rails. But the first part is worth reading.
Martin Hay scrutinizes the responses to his critical review of The Awful Grace of God which the authors have incorporated into their second book, written to bolster their original thesis concerning Ray and the King assassination.
The strength of the book lies in the tracing of the Oswald files through the CIA under Angleton’s dominion. No book on Angleton has done this before. And that is certainly a commendable achievement. Hopefully, this will become a staple of future Angleton scholarship, writes Jim DiEugenio.
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